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ABIBLOG: ABICOR BINZEL's Welding Blog

Practical tips for welding: contact tips

Posted by Markus Preis on Aug 11, 2020 5:34:31 AM

What you need to know for the use of power contact tube, contact nozzle, contact tube & Co.

The contact tip – also known as contact nozzle or power contact tube – is the smallest but most important wear part on a MIG/MAG torch, and it makes no difference whether it is a hand-held torch, an automatic torch or a robotic welding torch. The contact tip has a very considerable influence on the quality of the MIG/MAG welding process and the service life or machine availability in the welding process.

Hardly any wear part is subject to deterioration and is as close to the welding process as the contact tip. For this reason, we dedicate our own blog to this relatively small part.

How to Limit Micro-Arcing in Robotic Welding

Posted by Jason Jamiel on Aug 5, 2020 9:53:00 AM

Micro-arcing in a welding process are small arcs, usually not visible, that happen within the contact tip or wire liner. Instead of making a positive contact all the way through the tip, or at least always on the tip at some point, your wire is making inconsistent contact to the contact tip. This compromises current transfer and causes the wire to micro-arc inside the contact tip.

Topics: Robotic Welding

Automated welding: How to minimize welding errors

Posted by Jörg Ehling on Aug 4, 2020 10:57:26 AM

The beam on the workshop floor seems endless. The back hurts already at the mere thought of having to weld in the same position for the next few hours. Take up position, put on, weld off, put down, slide forward. Unfortunately, it is unavoidable that over time the welding seam is not as good as it was at the beginning. Or maybe it can? Automated welding provides a remedy ... for poor weld seam quality of long, repetitive welding tasks, for welding errors, but also for monotonous and painful joints.

Topics: Robotic Welding

Understanding Porosity in Robotic Welding

Posted by Jeff Henderson on Jul 22, 2020 9:40:00 AM

Porosity is the bane of existence in robotic welding.

It happens. You don’t know where it comes from all the time, or how it’s happening, and you spend days or even weeks troubleshooting to figure it out.

We’ve all been there.

Topics: Robotic Welding

Solving Welding Burnbacks in Robotic Applications

Posted by Jeff Henderson on Jul 7, 2020 9:19:00 AM

A burnback in welding is when your wire burns back and sticks itself to your contact tip. There are several reasons this can happen. The most primary causes of burnbacks in a robotic application include:

Topics: Robotic Welding

Don’t be afraid of automation when welding!

Posted by Simon Opper on Jul 2, 2020 5:37:29 AM

Why cobot welding can be the solution for small and medium-sized companies

Automatically working welding robots as far as the eye can see. The robot arms move sometimes hectically, sometimes silently. There is a hiss, hum, and crackle in the air. You can only recognize a person here and there. Automation clearly dominates. Such a vision is more of a fear image for small and medium-sized companies, because people here seem to be completely in the background, yes, being pushed out of their job. So it seems. A machine like a collaborative robot – a so-called cobot – can support people in their work. The use of cobots in welding can thus become an economical solution for small and medium-sized companies.

Topics: Robotic Welding

Robotic Welding Galvanized Steel

Posted by Jeff Henderson on Jun 23, 2020 8:55:00 AM

Galvanized has become increasingly popular in the automotive manufacturing space as a corrosion resistant coating on steels. Mainly, it's put on there in a hot dip fashion where you're actually dipping the material in molten zinc and coating it that way. There's electro plating and galvanneal plating also. 

Topics: Robotic Welding

Explaining Fume Extraction Mitigation Measures

Posted by Etienne Blouin on Jun 9, 2020 11:12:00 AM

How to mitigate welding fume is a big topic. People, by instinct, oftentimes say, "Oh, I'll put a mask on and that'll be sufficient"

Now, however, there is a systematic approach that's been used by OSHA or any health and safety offices. Now, the approach is to start looking at the process, and starting at the bottom of mitigation pyramid and systematically moving up.

Eliminating or Substituting the Weld Process

The first question to ask is if it is possible to eliminate or substitute the process that's causing the fume? Obviously, most of the time it's not possible to remove welding from the operation. But it's worth considering if you are using stick welding or flux core welding whether you can substitute this process for a better process as far as smoke creation?

Topics: Fume Extraction

What is Welding Fume?

Posted by Etienne Blouin on May 25, 2020 11:09:00 AM

What is welding fumes? We all have an idea of what is welding fume. It is obviously coming from molten metal that you create when you're welding. The mixture of the welding smoke is changing from one process to the other, but overall, it's a mixture of very fine particles and gases.

Topics: Fume Extraction

How Seam Tracking Solutions Compare

Posted by Scott Huber on May 18, 2020 3:25:40 PM

Looking at Seam Tracking means looking at a variety of possible solutions. Depending on your process, material, and cycle time needs, the right solution will usually present itself over time.

But with if you aren't aware of ALL the solutions available?

Or just know about a couple?

Topics: Seam Tracking